TransAmerica

I was looking for something indoors. I didn’t want to get rained on or have to work in sweltering heat. I didn’t want to get hollered at and/or cussed out. I wanted a stable environment on all fronts. I did miss pulling wire for Joel Carriker. He always put sand underneath his houses. That made it fun to work in. I could crawl around in sand for an hour our two. The only time that was a pain was when I sweated. Then the sand adhered to my back and front. That was rough. I also missed the roofers. They were amazing. They were some of the most vulgar people I had ever met. I liked them a lot though. They were cool. They would smoke, chew, spit, cuss, drink and work like no one I’d ever seen. They had rotten teeth or no teeth. The could set a nail on the shingle and hit it once and move their other hand simultaneously. They were artist. They were incredibly accurate and lightning fast. It was their life. They could work in any weather but the rain and seemingly never complained, though they complained about most everything else.

I sort of missed Jr. Horton in Wadesboro, another builder who built nice homes. I liked going to Wadesboro because it was sort of a long trip and I could sleep on the way down. We got paid for being in the truck. The longer the trip the better. It was good nap time. We also played Pac Man in one of the diners in Wadesboro, or at least I did and I liked that. I didn’t do it a lot, but it was fun.

I missed going to the Mint Hill diner as well. There was a girl who was quite lovely in many ways and I liked looking at her. I never got the nerve to build a relationship with her or say anything to her, but it was fun going in there. I suppose I was thinking something would magically happen and sorta hoped so though I knew I couldn’t do anything about it since I was married. There was always a nagging feeling that I married the wrong person. I married because that is what you are supposed to do after high school. So I did. I took what I could get and as noted in a prior post the day before the wedding I had doubts and those doubts never left my mind.

There were many other experiences with Prince Electric that I will always remember I suppose. Even though there were the positives it was time to leave for better pastures. TransAmerica Delaval was hiring at the time and my Aunt Pat was working there. It seemed like a good fit for me. I applied and they hired me. I was making around $8 per hour with Prince and I think I got a bit more with TD. I know I left with $10 per hour 5 years later, which for 1986 when I left it was very good money. I worked at Hardees from about ’77 to ’79 and for Chuck Prince from ’79 to ’81 and TransAmercia from ’81 to ’86. TD was a life-altering experience.

This entry was posted in Rick's Job Stories by RickThomasNet. Bookmark the permalink.

About RickThomasNet

Rick Thomas leads a training network for Christians to assist them in becoming more effective soul care providers. RickThomas.Net reaches people around the world through consulting, training, podcasting, writing, counseling, and speaking. In 1990 he earned a BA in Theology, and 1991 he received a BS in Education. In 1993 he was ordained into Christian ministry, and in 2000 he graduated with an MA in Counseling from The Master’s College in Santa Clarita, CA. In 2006 he was recognized as a Fellow of the Association of Certified Biblical Counselors (ACBC). He also received certification from the International Association of Biblical Counselors (IABC). His organization is a training center for IABC.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.