Welcome to Cincinnati, Ohio

We left Florence, Kentucky and drove a few minutes, though it seemed, before we came upon a cityscape that looked intriguing. We wound through a few hills, and then there was a big city on the other side of a large river.

Cincinnati is a beautiful town, especially on the riverfront. It is the Ohio River. We saw a striking blue and white building that first caught our attention, and since we do “adventure driving,” we had to stop.

We found out that George Clooney’s dad lives in one of the condos in the blue and white building. (That’s my one “name drop” for the day.)

We pulled off the Interstate and wove our way around the riverfront area to find a parking spot. It is one long park, for kids mostly, along the Ohio River, where the Roebling Bridge stretches across the river. We found a parking spot and walked across the Ohio River and back again.

We then walked around the park, went up to the Underground Railroad Museum, walked down to the Tervis Store, went to The Great American Ball Park where the Reds play baseball, and had lunch at Skyline restaurant.

Skyline Restaurant

The ladies at the Tervis Store said we had to eat at Skyline, so we did. They piled about fourteen feet of cheese on top of chili spaghetti. And I had a coney too, which was a premature hotdog buried in more cheese. It was good, though there were gastronomical consequences.

As we were standing in the entryway of the restaurant, I needed to be free from the internal gurgling. And thinking it was only my children in the entryway, I set myself free. And while I was in mid-process (it was record-setting), a gentleman came out the door. My back was to him, so I assumed it was Lucia until he let out a belly laugh.

Later, I connected with him at the intersection, as we were waiting for the light and I apologized while telling him that I had never done that before in my life. He laughed again, as did my children.

Hall of Fame

RaeAnn, our Skyline waitress, gave us a half-price ticket for the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame, so we had to go. The museum is in a “park area” with the stadium. The entire area is fantastic. Well done.

My family is not into baseball that much, and they do not have the historical background that I do. So, let’s say that it was an emotional experience for me. As we walked through the museum, they played radio broadcasts from some of the most famous moments in Red’s history, e.g., Pete Rose breaking Ty Cobb’s lifetime hit record.

It was emotional because sports (and all things TV) was my escape from my childhood. The TV was a “portal” that permitted me to “go somewhere else” while never leaving my family. The TV was my “salvation” as a kid. Those radio broadcasts that I heard at the museum were the ones that I heard the moment they happened.

Bobblehead Anyone?

We also got four bobblehead statues of Johnny Vander Meer for touring the museum. It was a promotion. If any of you want one of those statues, you’re welcome to it if you pay for the shipping.

On the way back to the car, we ran into two actors gearing up in their Iron Man suits. We had to chat them up (and get a picture, of course).

There were many other things we did in Cincy, the best of which was talking to the people, i.e., the lady at the Underground Railroad Museum, the police officer at the Hall of Fame, the ladies at the Tervis Store, and RaeAnn. And then there was the lady down at the park and the Iron Men. I could spend a few days in Cincinnati. It was that good. But we had to move on.

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